100% Renewable Energy

Credit: ESB Professional/Shutterstock

Burning oil, gas and coal has not only polluted our air, water and land for decades; now it’s changing our climate even faster than scientists predicted it would. We can have healthier communities and a livable future for kids growing up today, but to get there, we first need to transform the way we produce and consume energy.

That's why, alongside our national network, we’re calling on communities, colleges and universities, corporations and other businesses, and our state governments to commit to 100% renewable energy. 

It’s a big, bold goal, one that would make America a world leader in the race toward a cleaner, healthier future — and it’s a goal that’s 100% possible. 

 

Leading the way forward

Consider: Companies ranging from Apple, Google and Facebook to General Motors, Johnson & Johnson and Coca Cola have already committed to going 100% renewable. So have cities like Rochester, Minn., San Diego, Georgetown, Texas, St. Petersburg, Fla., Greensburg, Kan., and Burlington, Vt. And so have universities from Colorado State University to Cornell.

State governments in California and Massachusetts have introduced bills that would require their states to achieve 100% renewable electricity by 2045 and 2050, respectively.

The best part is, the more cities, colleges and companies that go renewable, the faster wind and solar prices keep falling throughout the country — making it even easier for more to achieve 100% renewable energy.

Credit: Giselle Turner

Going 100% renewable is 100% possible

Solar power has tripled in America in just the last two years — with a new home or business going solar every one and a half minutes. It took 40 years for us to get to 1 million solar installations in the U.S. in 2016. Now we’re on track to add another 1 million new solar installations in just two years.

In many states, wind power is now cheaper than gas or coal. Clean energy continues to grow quickly, with prices dropping lower than even the most optimistic industry predictions of just a few years ago.

But we can do more, and we must do more to stave off the worst effects of climate change. 

Credit: Deepwater Wind

We need to keep building momentum

Recent actions in Washington, D.C., have threatened to slow down and even reverse the progress we’ve made so far.

It’s time to stop letting some slow-moving politicians drag their feet.

It’s time to urge our communities, our colleges and universities, our corporations and businesses, and our state governments to step up and lead.

Join our call, and help your community go 100% renewable.

We need to build a movement. The more people who join our call for 100% renewable power, the more local, state and corporate leaders will step up and take action. And we need more campuses, more communities and more companies to commit to 100% renewable. It will make a difference now and get us on the right track for the future.   

Credit: Adam Perri

Why wait?

Once, we were told that the pollution that came from burning oil, gas and coal was the price we had to pay for progress. Those days are over — especially since we know that burning fossil fuels is changing our climate and leaving our children with an uncertain future.

Scientists say we must stop burning virtually all fossil fuels by 2050 in order to spare kids growing up today from the devastating impacts of climate change.

And why should we wait?

Why wait for healthier communities with cleaner air and water when we can have them today?

Why wait until it’s impossible to leave the kids we know and love a safer, healthier tomorrow?

Why wait, when we can start changing the conversation about how we produce and consume energy — so it’s no longer a question of whether we’ll get to 100% renewable power, but how fast?

Why wait, when America has the responsibility, the ingenuity and the will to start leading the world to a 100% renewable future right now?

Credit: Steven Gilbert

We’ve got the power

We’re ready for this. Our national network has done a lot to promote solar, wind and energy efficiency on the state and local levels. We’ve won clean energy policies, from pro-solar initiatives to clean cars programs to renewable energy standards in 22 states, all of which are driving down the costs of wind and solar, and reducing carbon pollution.

With renewable energy, we can have healthier communities right now and a more liveable future for kids growing up today. Together, we can do this. A 100% renewable future based on 100% American-made energy is 100% possible. And it starts now.  

Credit: Peter Kirkeskov Rasmussen via Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Issue updates

Report | Environment Maryland Research and Policy Center

Making Sense of the "Coal Rush"

Energy companies have proposed building a fleet of new coal-fired power plants across America. As of June 2006, power producers have approximately 150 new coal-fired plants on the drawing board, representing a $137 billion investment and the capacity to supply power to 96 million homes.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment America Research and Policy Center

America's Clean Energy Stars

States are leading the way toward a new energy future that is healthier for the environment and America’s economy. Over the past decade, states have enacted a variety of policies to encourage more efficient use of energy, increase the use of clean renewable energy, and reduce the environmental impact of energy use.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment America Research and Policy Center

Building an Energy-Efficient America

America is the largest consumer of energy in the world. Almost half of the energy we use—10 percent of the energy in the world—powers our buildings. Most of this energy comes from burning fossil fuels. Our reliance on these fuels makes us vulnerable to supply disruptions, contributes to global warming and other environmental problems, and is becoming increasingly expensive.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment Maryland Research and Policy Center

Renewing America

Across the country, Americans are hurting. From the big cities of the coasts to the industrial heartland to our rural communities, the slumping economy is taking its toll in shuttered businesses, disappearing jobs, bankruptcies, foreclosures and an increased sense of anxiety about our collective future.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment Maryland Research and Policy Center

Building a Better Future

America is the largest consumer of energy in the world.  The majority of this energy is derived from dirty, polluting sources such as coal, oil, natural gas and nuclear power. Our consumption of these fuels exacerbates global warming, keeps us dependent upon oil and other fossil fuels, and undermines our economy.  40 percent of America’s energy—ten percent of all the energy used in the world—goes towards powering our buildings.

> Keep Reading

Pages

View AllRSS Feed